Frequently asked questions

Once a person has been in contact with the virus it takes about 2 weeks before symptoms appear. Chickenpox starts with a mild fever and is characterized by the itchy, blistery rash that forms over the entire body and starts to crust over within a few days until they fall off. Chickenpox blisters show up in waves. While the first blisters begin to crust, new spots might appear. While the symptoms last for only a number of days, it takes about 10-14 days until all blisters have crusted over and your child is no longer contagious

A single infection usually confers lifelong immunity against the disease. However, should a new born or baby contract chickenpox in the first 6 months of their life, the chances are high that they will contract the illness again at a later stage of their life.

Chickenpox is a common and extremely contagious airborne virus (varicella zoster, member of the herpes virus family) usually contracted in childhood. It spreads through the air by coughing or sneezing or by touching an infected child.

Yes, there is vaccine that prevents chickenpox. However, not every country offers this vaccination programme. Some countries vaccinate the entire population. Whilst other countries vaccinate babies and children only. Check with your general practitioner about options of vaccination in your country. Keep in mind that generally speaking a case of chickenpox passes without complications and is not life threatening.

WPoxClin contains 2QR, a Bio-Active Bacterial Blocker. This blocker helps the skin’s natural skin barrier in blocking harmful bacteria. The bacterial blocker in PoxClin is a polysaccharide derived from the Aloe Barbadensis plant. It blocks harmful bacteria from the environment and therefore helps to protect the skin from their attack. This, unlike most antibiotics and antiseptics is a completely natural process and does not involve harsh, toxic chemicals.

Although the use of PoxClin is safe, we advise adults with chickenpox to consult their general practitioner, especially if they are pregnant or have a weak immune system. The reason being is that in adults chickenpox is normally more severe than in children and could accompany pneumonia.

If your child has contracted chickenpox, inform their playgroup, nursery, pre-school and school and keep them home until all the blisters have crusted over and they are no longer contagious. This normally occurs a week after the first rash started. Some playgroups, schools and such have different rules as your child may have contracted chickenpox there in the first place. Therefore it is advisable to coordinate with your child’s teacher in each individual case.

Try to avoid public places, as others may catch the virus, which may be dangerous, especially to those being pregnant or have a weak immune system. If your child has contracted chickenpox keep them away from the playground and other public places until all the blisters have crusted over and they are no longer contagious. This normally takes place a week after the first rash started. If you bring your child to a playground or any other such place inform people/parents that your child has chickenpox and is still contagious. Be reminded that just because you think it is fine to bring your contagious child to public places doesn't mean everybody else will be.

Chickenpox is highly contagious. If your child has contracted chickenpox, he/she should not go swimming or play contact sports unless all blisters have crusted over. This normally takes place a week after the first rash started. Try to avoid public places, as others may catch the virus, which may be dangerous, especially to those who are pregnant or have a weak immune system. Swimming may also soften the crusts, which may result in a more intense itch and the crusts may fall off early leaving scars.

It is fine for your child to shower or bath quickly while having chickenpox. Some children may find a bath in lukewarm or cold water relieves the itch. Do not bath in hot water as this may increase the itch and do not bath for too long. Pat your child dry after showering/bathing. Do not rub, to avoid blisters getting infected, crusts falling off and leaving scars.

Chickenpox is highly contagious. Your child may not be allowed to fly until all the crusts have fallen off. This is because germs circulate easily through the air condition systems on planes. The virus may be especially dangerous to those who are pregnant or have a weak immune system. In general it is only allowed to fly with a medical report. Each airline has their own policy so check with them first. In case of one having chickenpox, inform your travel insurance company right away to make sure that you will be covered if you have to cancel or postpone your vacation or if you need to extend your trip until your child is fit enough to travel back home.

Children with chickenpox should not visit relatives or friends in a hospital or ward without prior approval from such an institution.

Most women have had chickenpox in childhood and are therefore immune or have had a chickenpox vaccination. However a small percentage of pregnant women develop chickenpox, which can cause complications for both the unborn baby and the pregnant mother. There is a small chance for the baby to develop a condition called fetal varicella syndrome (FVS), which can cause serious abnormalities of various parts of the body. For detailed information about chances of your baby developing FVS, please contact your midwife or gynaecologist, as different stages of pregnancy bear different risks. If you are pregnant and you think or know that you may have contracted chickenpox contact your midwife, gynaecologist and/or general practitioner right away.